🎦 The Good, the Bad and the Ugly full movie english download, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly full movie download mp4 in english, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly full movie free download in english. 🎬
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Year:
1966
Country:
USA, Italy, Spain, West Germany
Genre:
Action, Adventure, Western
IMDB rating:
8.9
Director:
Sergio Leone
Eli Wallach as Tuco
Lee Van Cleef as Sentenza
Aldo Giuffrè as Alcoholic Union Captain
Luigi Pistilli as Father Pablo Ramirez
Enzo Petito as Storekeeper
Claudio Scarchilli as Mexican peon
John Bartha as Sheriff (as John Bartho)
Antonio Casale as Jackson / Bill Carson
Sandro Scarchilli as Mexican peon
Benito Stefanelli as Member of Angel Eyes' Gang
Angelo Novi as Monk
Storyline: Blondie (The Good) is a professional gunslinger who is out trying to earn a few dollars. Angel Eyes (The Bad) is a hit man who always commits to a task and sees it through, as long as he is paid to do so. And Tuco (The Ugly) is a wanted outlaw trying to take care of his own hide. Tuco and Blondie share a partnership together making money off Tuco's bounty, but when Blondie unties the partnership, Tuco tries to hunt down Blondie. When Blondie and Tuco come across a horse carriage loaded with dead bodies, they soon learn from the only survivor (Bill Carson) that he and a few other men have buried a stash of gold in a cemetery. Unfortunately Carson dies and Tuco only finds out the name of the cemetery, while Blondie finds out the name on the grave. Now the two must keep each other alive in order to find the gold. Angel Eyes (who had been looking for Bill Carson) discovers that Tuco and Blondie met with Carson and knows they know the location of the gold. All he needs is for the two to ...
Type Resolution File Size Codec Bitrate Format
1080p 1920x816 px 13374 Mb h264 1536 Kbps mkv Download
720p 1280x544 px 9159 Mb h264 7342 Kbps mkv Download
HQ DVD-rip 720x304 px 2467 Mb mpeg4 1931 Kbps mkv Download
DVD-rip 640x480 px 2201 Mb mpeg4 1721 Kbps mp4 Download
iPhone 480x204 px 975 Mb xvid 600 Kbps mov Download
Reviews
A true epic and one of the greatest films of all time.
I saw this movie for the first time on my tiny 15 inch screen of my TV/DVD player, and even on this minuscule format I was still simply amazed by the sheer scope of it. Now I understand and acknowledge the usual complaints against the film, namely the fact that the movie is almost three hours long with many scenes that tend to drag on for minutes with little dialog or action, however it is these scenes that make the movie the masterpiece that it is. Every shot whether it be an expansive landscape or an extreme close-up Sergio Leone draws you into his own version of the old west. A world where three men chase each other across the desert in search of 100,000 dollars worth of Confederate gold. Along the way they encounter Yankee and Confederate soldiers, Mexican bandits, bounty hunters in a journey that culminates in one of the most riveting showdowns in cinema history. What I found most interesting about this film however was the influence it obviously had on modern filmmaker Quentin Tarentino. Many of his trademarks (very memorable characters, long shots centered on a single character, intense standoffs involving multiple characters) can be found in abundance in this film as well. In fact Tarentino's Kun Fu epic Kill Bill goes so far as to barrow multiple songs from Leone's Dollars Trilogy. In the end all this adds up to make The Good the Bad and the Ugly in my opinion one of the greatest films of all time.
2007-07-02
This movie is Flawless...this movie has no parallels...this is the Best one I 'll ever see.
I want the rating meter to allow me to rate it more than 10. I love this epic movie. Patiently shot and created , it exudes a scent of eternal beauty. This is my friends every movie goer's delight. A movie which can't be bettered. Full of outrageously funny puns and comic lines; made with an audacious appetite for cinematic patience, this movie has it all.

The background score is classic. I still get charged when I see the final scenes of the movie playing to Ennio Morricone's The Trio.

Deep dialogues an unbelievably smooth screenplay this movie is perfect.

It's detractors complain that some parts are overdone and are too clichéd. Well those things hardly matter when you have Blondie, Tuco, Angel Eyes , The drunk Army Captain on screen exhibiting something completely out of this world in terms of cinematic achievement.

I have never seen a better genre in movies than westerns and in that genre this movie stands out. This movie is undoubtedly the greatest one ever made in any genre.
2010-03-04
the best western, ever
often overlooked or belittled by so-called "film critics", GBU is a monumental influential masterpiece. everything works: music, photography, acting, dialogue, directing, etc. the cinematography and music stand out as legendary film history. who can forget the Morricone "whistles". or the harsh landscape united with a sweaty dirty super close-up of an unknown Italian actor. there's just too much to say about this landmark movie. what a combo: THE "spaghetti western", directed by an Italian, starring american leads, shot in Spain, and taking place in the barren American west. wow.remember, there's two kinds of people in this world, my friend, those who appreciate a masterpiece like GBU, and those who don't know much 'bout great movies!!!!!!!!
1999-01-24
A western masterpiece
The third of Sergio Leone's trilogy of spaghetti westerns is his definitive masterpiece.This epic,sprawling western is graced by breathtaking photography, a fantastic score and Leone's masterful direction. The performances are all iconic with scene-stealer Eli Wallach the standout.The earlier films in the trilogy don't have the same tremendous sweep and scope.The dry and dark humor also elevates this classic to greater heights.Although I'm always somewhat annoyed by the acting of the Italian supporting cast, with their excessive macho laughing and some assorted weird characters,it doesn't detract from the enjoyment of these movies."The Good,the Bad and the Ugly" is in my opinion one of the best westerns ever made.
2007-07-01
One the greatest, most impressive, interesting, breathtaking, and groundbreaking films of all time
The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly is one of those movies that everyone has heard of but not enough people have seen. It pushed itself rather boldly into pop culture and 44 years after it first hit theaters in Italy, it still gains respect and admiration in the United States.

It's the third part of the Man With No Name Trilogy, and was preceded by Fistful of Dollars and For a Few Dollars More, both of which are very commendable films themselves. All three movies revolve around the titular man, who goes by a different alias in each film, this time being called Blondie. The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly is a prequel to the first two movies, meaning that it is not required to watch them first and this film stands alone fine.

The story begins by introducing us to our three central characters: the violent but childish Tuco (the ugly), the heartless mercenary Angel Eyes (the bad), and the mysterious bounty hunter Blondie (the good). While traveling through the desert, Blondie and Tuco come across a dying man who knows the location of a huge deposit of gold buried in a cemetery. Tuco hears the name of the cemetery and Blondie hears the name of the grave, but neither will tell the other for fear of being double-crossed so they are forced to work together. As they embark on an incredibly journey through 1860s Southern America as it is torn apart by the Civil War, they encounter various obstacles including but not limited to the involvement of Angle Eyes, who also wants the money. The whole thing ends with a heart-pounding standoff at the center of the cemetery in which all three men put their lives on the line.

The story is gripping and genuinely interesting, the actors all put forth outstanding performances, the cinematography is as good as it gets, the music has to be heard to be believed, and the climax is one of the most intense events ever recorded on film. There's no such thing as a perfect movie, but this one comes as close as any will likely get.
2010-04-15
One of the greatest films ever made!
And Sergio Leone had to show Hollywood how a western should be done. Earthy, gritty, moody, rambling, funny and just plain nasty too. One thing most people forget about the Sergio Leone Dollar trilogy films is that they were made when westerns were really staid and boring, with zero atmosphere and very mechanical. Then came these movies, with THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY being the last and the greatest of the three Dollar films. Cinema wasn't the same after it was released. And to show influential this film is, it transcended its "western" genre and influenced practically every type of films made after that. Heck, I'm not even a western fan and I thoroughly admire what Leone and the gang created here. It's big, bold, melancholic, lusty, giddy and operatic.

The thing I really love about THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY is the atmosphere. It's almost one kind. Never duplicated in any other film since (and that includes Clint Eastwood's dry cowboy flicks). One major contributing factor is obviously Ennio Morricone's unforgettable score, probably one of the greatest scores ever made. The music during the ending, when Tuco searches the cemetery, it's spine tinglingly powerful.

Of the three characters, Tuco steals the show. He's the heart and soul of film. It's probably Eli Wallach's greatest performance. He immersed himself in the role and, in the processed, really became Tuco.

My only complaint about THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY is that it is a low budget film and as expansive and epic as it is, the film sorta looks cheap. Practically everything was shot outside. There are few sets in the movie and when we are within four walls, the sets look, hmm, cheap. I just wished the production design was as expansive looking as the vision Leone had in mind. The film would have been perfect then. But that's something I can clearly overlook.

When I watch a movie like THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY, I get depressed. Depressed because at one time films were actually amazing, groundbreaking and entertaining. The 1960s were one of the greatest era in movie-making. Sadly today's films don't even come close to the stunning creative output of that decade. They should re-release THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY on the big screen. It's a classic film.
2007-01-10
Still Waiting for 'the Good' Parts
I had wanted to see this for years and when it came on TCM last night rated 4 stars I thought "Perfect". Boy, was I disappointed.

From the cheesy credits to the excessive length (okay, we get it. The Bad guy is bad and the Ugly guy is ugly.) to the unrealistic shooting (every bullet hits its mark exactly, whether it's one-shot kills, shooting hats off without leaving a mark, or shooting through ropes to prevent hangings), to too much the utterly dislike-able Eli Wallach chewing up the scenery, to the string of unbelievable coincidences (wagon comes by with one guy just alive enough to tell Tuco where $200K in gold is, but 'Blondie' - who was near-dead and some distance away - the specifics), etc. etc.

This spaghetti western needed more meat and less sauce. It's probably significant for being significant (e.g. making Eastwood a star) than for its true content.
2016-07-31
Sergio Leone's most visionary film...
Sergio Leone is arguably the most visionary director of all time. They say that before he even had a written script he could picture exactly what was to be on screen and the camera's direction in leading his characters. It was Sergio's World - an alternate place in an alternate time that he was free to control. He controlled the audience and his story like no other director.

To me, his best film was the one that was on many critics' ten worst films of 1984 list: "Once Upon a Time in America." I love the finished director's cut, the cut of the film Sergio Leone himself wanted and pictured in his mind while filming the movie. Unfortunately, the editor of the film cut everything into a two-hour picture and messed up the timeline for the theatrical release in 1984 - the result was a disastrous motion picture that now, with the director's cut, stands as one of the best of all time. James Woods once said that one of the critics who named it the worst film of 1984 later named it the best film of the decade.

"Once Upon a Time in America" was Sergio's dream project, one that took him ten years to get on the big screen and ultimately killed him by sucking the life out of him, but "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly" (1967) was undoubtably his most visual film. The extreme close-ups, the great way he lets the audience see nothing but what he wants - as far as he saw it, the audience should not wonder what is off-screen; whatever is within the frames is all there is. Compared to "Once Upon a Time" it seems a bit more corny and unrealistic - but it is a spaghetti western, and that is simply the point. It stands above the rest as the best spaghetti western of them all.

Leone is best remembered for his extreme close-ups. Director Quentin Tarantino once said, among many other things about Leone, his role model, that when he started out he knew not many camera directions, so when he wanted an extreme close-up in a film he'd shout, "I want a Sergio Leone on this guy!" Quentin Tarantino has such a respect for Leone that he even suggested the title "Once Upon a Time in Mexico" to director Robert Rodriguez, the title, of course, a derivation on "Once Upon a Time in the West" and "Once Upon a Time in America," both films of Sergio Leone.

"The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," a.k.a. "Buono, il bruto, il cattivo, il," is the final film in the Dollars Trilogy - "A Fistful of Dollars," "For a Few Dollars More," and, of course, "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly." I have yet to see this film's predecessors, but I doubt they are much better than this film. It isn't really about anything per se - it's a showcase of art and camera techniques. It is a showcase for Sergio Leone and a great one at that. I have no real care about the themes or outcomes - I simply enjoy being controlled by a masterful director such as Leone. When there's a director who can literally push in and give the audience specifically what he wants them to see, without the audience feeling cheated, you know you have a great director, because there's a fine line between a selfish director and a visionary director. Leone has a bit of both, so indistinct that it is hard to notice. The same thing was done in Carol Reed's "The Third Man" (1949), and the same is done here. And it is pulled off without any objections from the audience.

Clint Eastwood is The Good - he rides around the desert kidnapping criminals, giving them to the authorities and claiming reward money, and then freeing the criminals before they are to be hanged. He meets Tuco (Eli Wallach), a.k.a. The Ugly, and does his routine - but The Ugly fights back and, ultimately, kidnaps good ol' Clint, taking him into the desert and practically torturing him in the heat.

Then The Good overhears where a stash of gold is hidden from a dying man. The Ugly wants the gold so much that he nurses The Good back to health so that they can go off on a wild goose chase and search for the treasure. But there is already another man searching for the treasure - Angel Eyes, a.k.a. The Bad (Lee Van Cleef), a man whose skills at gunfighting match those of The Good, a true marksman if ever there was such a thing.

There's a terrific scene towards the end of "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," where three men have found the gold buried in a graveyard. At exactly the same time. They each have guns pointed at each other. They could all pull their triggers and die, or kill one of the three and the two could then take the money and split it. Leone zooms in with his extreme close-ups and truly gives the audience a sense of paranoia, a sense of what it would feel like in a circumstance such as that. Sergio Leone is a great director, perhaps the most visionary of all time, and now that his films are turning up again with their intended running times, the realization strikes and sinks in.

He's an even better director than we thought he was.

5/5 stars -

John Ulmer
2003-10-03
A simple classic and a must see by every Eastwood fan
I have been a Clint Eastwood fan for years. But I have NEVER watched his Westerns. That's kind of idiotic isn't it?? Well suddenly I'm having an Eastwood movement and sinking myself into Westerns for the first time in my life and it only made sense that I start with what some critics and fans call "The Greatest Western ever made." In some respects I agree with that because it embodies everything that the Western is...even if you have never seen a Western you know the way they are supposed to go and The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly encompasses every aspect of the stereotypical Western. Also a film like this has to be judged by it's release time as well and for 1966, this film's violent and gritty story would have made heads explode and Eastwood's trademark Man with No Name made Eastwood the gosh darned coolest, slickest man in history. The story explodes into an epic 3 + hour (extended cut) film about three man of completely different personalities, backgrounds, and goals trying to find a hidden treasure by a Civil War soldier and stay alive while basically beating the living daylights out of each other. The film is gritty, bleak, and the three main characters are so watchable that each one could carry their own film.

Clint Eastwood...how can you possibly say that name and then try to critique the man's acting. If you looked up the definition of masculine in the dictionary...there his picture would be...probably from this film. Eastwood's raspy voice, his "doesn't take any crap" attitude, and completely violent personality (in his characters of course) makes him the best gun fighter in ANY Western. He is the perfect leading man especially for a Western and he had to be THE GOOD in The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. Eastwood is Eastwood and that is the highest compliment you can give. Lee Van Cleef embodies THE BAD, I mean the man has being a villain down to a science and although he doesn't share a whole lot of screen time with the stars he has his own brand of justice that makes him the perfect villain. In a lot of ways he is the polar opposite of Eastwood. He still has the raspy voice, and the cool demeanor and he has this killer instinct that makes him petrifying to see on screen. But all in all he doesn't get the majority of the story and there is a lot of back story to his character left unexplored. I would have loved to see a sequel or another story where he plays Angel Eyes because it would have great to see him back on screen in this role. And finally I save the best for last. I have found a new absolute favorite screen character in Tuco played by veteran actor Eli Wallach. Tuco is THE UGLY in every way shape and form. His drunken, sarcastic, and annoying personality makes him the real stand out performance in this film. In fact he seems to get the majority of the lines and the screen time as we watch his journey to try and get rich. And on top of that the tumultuous relationship between his off again, on again partner Eastwood's "Blondie" as named by Tuco. The two of them start as partners until Eastwood turns on him and leaves him which only makes Tuco seek revenge in a horrible way, one of the great scenes where Tuco forces Eastwood across the desert nearly killing him in the process. But you know that can only mean Eastwood will get the last word and he does. Tuco is amazing. He's hilarious, he's bumbling, but he has fantastic good luck when it comes to getting away and on top of it all despite his humorous character he's not easy to kill or a push over. He's blood thirsty, crafty and skilled as a gun man and a villain. The whole film must be watched for Wallach's Tuco alone.

This is my first taste but not my last of Eastwood Westerns and Sergio Leone who apparently is the be all and end all of Action western directors. I have the first two installments of the Man With No Name trilogy fired up in the VCR and ready to go. The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly in many ways is not outstanding and yet it has this mysterious quality that just sucks you in and makes it an absolute classic. From the dusty streets of the Western town amidst the brooding Civil War and the front, this film encompasses everything. And you can't mention the film without pointing out that haunting Western theme which almost seems like it's used comically but perhaps that's because it has been used as such in the future. You can't ever start a love for Westerns without seeing this...I have no doubt. And it will permanently go down in my books as one of my favorite Westerns. I will say it didn't need to be as long as it was and perhaps more of a climatic ending would have been nice but it's a classic and you can barely pick it apart. Made on a million bucks and probably 100 times that made back. Just see it!! 8.5/10
2006-07-22
Primal honesty and morality
After many years of barely watching any movies, I treated myself to several classics recently. And this was the best.

That I so enjoyed this movie so much came as a shock to me. I literally never before have been able to even sit through a western, which (in my admittedly limited experience) was schlock action starring John Wayne as the taciturn all-American good guy being tough and beating up the outlaws. Watching GBU, I was enthralled for the entire three hours. Twice. And if I had time, I would have watched it a third time.

The setting is typically western: a dry, dusty panorama in which men barely co-exist with each other; few wasted words; and lots of action, horses, and gunfighting in a wild west barely governed by incipient institutions of law & order – all shrouded within a morality play of good vs. bad. But what I liked so much is exactly what I hate about John Wayne westerns – the seriousness and honesty with which moral context is considered. In Hollywood, good vs. bad is as thoughtlessly superscripted as the protagonists' white and black hats. In GBU every remnant of moralizing has been ruthlessly cut.

Good, Bad, and Ugly are personified in the form of three characters: Bad ("Sentenza") is the easiest to understand. He is *very* bad, perhaps not so different from other villains, but much more sharply developed; murderous, sadistic, traitorous, and remorseless. Good ("Blondie") and Ugly ("Tuco") are more puzzling, but their labels are the key to the movie. Both Blondie and Tuco are outlaws and killers with only the barest hint of morality, but they're not evil in the same way that Sentenza is. Tuco is demonstrative, emotional, loud, wild, and unpredictable; but driven by survival rather than satanic urges. Blondie is cool, calm, rational and controlled – in many ways similar to Sentenza – but whereas Sentenza tortures, maims, kills, and lies for the hell of it, even apparently enjoys it, Blondie simply goes about his business coolly, and shows several poignant hints of empathy, decency, and a sense of justice.

GBU takes place during the Civil War and strips away the high-level political struggle of history books, leaving us with the soldier's vantage point of brutality, pointless death, and some individual decency. The politics are indecipherable from this vantage point. GBU hits this point home when our protagonists wind up in a prison camp because the oncoming gray cavalry uniforms turn out to be dust-covered blue. Later, they encounter an army fighting over a worthless bridge, suffering countless pointless deaths and casualties. Because Leone has so rigorously excised traditional off-the-shelf morality, the few instances of humanity are remarkably poignant. One such instance is when Blondie shares his coat and cigar with a dying soldier; another is when prisoners are forced – by Sentenza's orders – to play music to cover up the screams of the tortured. Sentenza apparently enjoyed the irony of beautiful sounds used for such ends; the musicians are, of course, pained by it.

That was one of many extraordinarily striking scenes. The honesty of the moral context was what I liked best about the film, but I liked everything else too. Indeed the same primal, ruthless honesty that characterizes the character development pervades the film. The music is unlike anything I'd ever heard – it's an audible version of the arid west and the tensions and lawlessness that characterize the film. Underlying the entire score is one instantly memorable theme starting off with what sounds like a screaming hyena. The story took place in New Mexico, and even though it was filmed in Spain, it really does look like New Mexico; and just as in life in the American west, the wide, breathtaking panorama tends to subordinates dialog. Indeed, it is several minutes into the film before even one word is spoken.

The plot was extremely clever – and never predictable. High level suspense is maintained for the full three hours. It was hard to imagine how it could unfold – three uncompromising outlaws in search of one buried treasure; cooperation was not in their nature, but nothing was ever done out of character. Any Western cliché that you can think of is either given a unique twist or destroyed by masterful storytelling. For example there is an utterly irreverent scene in which Tuco meets his brother, a sincere Priest, and turns platitudes upside down. The brother begins with the standard rebuke of the criminal's behavior, but Tuco punches back and says, "Where we come from there were only two ways out. You lacked the courage to do what I've done." The movie is also irreverently funny: For example, Twice Tuco gained the upper hand on Blondie and said:

"There are two kinds of spurs(?), my friend. Those that come in by the door, and (crosses himself) those that come in by the window."

"There are two kinds of people in the world, my friend. Those who have a rope around their neck and those who have the job of cutting." Later Blondie gained the advantage of Tuco and observed:

"You see in this world there's two kinds of people my friend - those with loaded guns, and those who dig. You dig." In addition to all these specific attributes, a unique and strikingly cool style infuses the entire film: long scenes of tense silences – never for an instant boring; and telling, startling close-ups and transitions. Most noteworthy was the film's climax. As the protagonists stand there with their fingers on their holsters, waiting for the first person to go for their gun(s), the transitions start out slowly, and speed up as the tension increases. As I write this, I wish I had my own copy of the film, just so I could see this scene again.

Not just a great western, but easily one of the best movies of *any* kind ever made.
2007-12-26
See Also
📹 The Good, the Bad and the Ugly full movie english download, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly full movie with english subtitles free download, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly full movie download with english subtitles. 📀
×